21 February 2014

Have you Liked Gaspereau Press on Facebook?

Gaspereau Press is taking a crack at ramping up its social media presence by reviving its long-dormant Facebook page. I’ll still be making posts to this blog from time to time when the subject matter calls for a longer format, but to keep up with things here in the printshop and with our author events, follow the Gaspereau Press Facebook group.

ANDREW STEEVES ¶ PRINTER & PUBLISHER

04 November 2013

More Wayzgoose Photos

Here are some more wayzgoose photos, these ones taken by Thaddeus Holownia of Anchorage Press, Jolicure, NB.


Andrew Steeves demonstrating the art of hot metal typecasting on a Ludlow caster.


Type designer Rod McDonald sporting a vintage Gaspereau Press T-shirt.


Sewing booklets in the bindery.


George Walker pulling the devil’s tail on the Albion iron handpress.


George Walker hamming it up for an appreciative audience of wayzgoosers.


Amos Kennedy printing posters.


Hillary Savage printing slugs hot off the Ludlow caster. Steven Slipp in the background.


A gaggle of Wayzgoosers.


Adam Steeves (left) showing a press sheet to wayzgoosers.

ANDREW STEEVES ¶ PRINTER & PUBLISHER

CBC Radio Halifax Kid's Book Club

Here’s a link to this morning’s short documentary piece about the visit of CBC Radio Halifax Kid’s Book Club to the printing works at Gaspereau Press. It’s a nice little piece. Thanks to everyone at CBC Radio Halifax for helping to make the visit possible.

ANDREW STEEVES ¶ PRINTER & PUBLISHER

02 November 2013

American Houseguests & A Visit from CBC Radio’s Kid’s Book Club


This is a digital rendition of the photograph Thaddeus Holownia made at the Gaspereau Press Wayzgoose on Saturday.(Front, left to right) Julie Rosvell, David Brewer, Michelle Walker, Sue Goyette, George Walker, Andrew Steeves, Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr, (back, left to right) Joe Stevens, Stephen Quick, Adam Steeves, Gary Dunfield, Hillary Savage, Jason Dewinetz, Ceri Sloan, Connie Sheppard.

After an extraordinarily busy wayzgoose weekend, you’d think that we’d be anxious to kick back and relax, or at least to draw the blinds, bar our doors and put out the ‘do not disturb’ sign for a few weeks while we recovered from the shock of over 200 visitors. Nope, not to be.


When I invited Hillary Savage to be one of our guests at the wayzgoose, I sweetened the offer by insisting that she stay and work in our printshop for the week that followed.


And we had a great week. Hillary managed to handset and print two different broadsides during her stay with us, despite the many worthy diversions I threw in her way – like an afternoon excursion to study old books at the university archives or coffee with a reporter from the local newspaper. (Hillary’s day job is at a small weekly newspaper in Maine.) In this photo, Hillary is adding a rusty tone to the bottom of one of her broadsides. When we were casting around for a way to achieve the effect she desired, I suggested that she roll it on with a tooth from a spring harrow which I uncovered years ago from the site of my great-grandfather’s abandoned farm in New Brunswick. She rubbed the ink into the pitted surface of the rusty harrow tooth and then rolled it across the sheet. It looked fabulous. Holding the sheets in this photo is Kings County municipal counsellor and housing activist Emma Van Rooyen. I thought Emma might find it interesting to hear some stories from Hillary about the relationship between the local press and the county government in small-town Maine.


On Saturday morning, as Hillary packed up to head for home, we had a visit from three of the four young participants in CBC Radio Halifax’s most recent kid’s on-air book club. Emma (and her sister Molly), Cassidy and Aidan were accompanied by CBC Radio host Carmen Clausen who recorded much of the visit for broadcast on CBC Halifax’s Information Morning this coming Monday.


We showed the kids how modern books are made. We also helped them cast their names in metal on a Ludlow caster, print their own two-colour covers and then handsew some little blank notebooks. I knew it was going well when Carmen swung the microphone over to Emma part way through the morning and asked what her impression of the printshop was so far. “Impression!” guffawed Emma, “oh, that’s funny!” Clearly, they were into it.

With the travel and visiting of October behind me, I intend to revert to my usual somewhat elusive habits and get some work done. Over the next few months I will be editing books for our spring list and enjoying the relative solitude that task requires.

ANDREW STEEVES ¶ PRINTER & PUBLISHER.